Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

State v. Taylor

Court of Appeals of Iowa

March 8, 2017

STATE OF IOWA, Plaintiff-Appellee,
v.
WILLIAM LAMONT TAYLOR, Defendant-Appellant.

         Appeal from the Iowa District Court for Polk County, Jeffrey D. Farrell, Judge.

         A defendant appeals his convictions for assault on a peace officer with a dangerous weapon, as an habitual offender, and eluding. AFFIRMED.

          Nicholas B. Dial of Dial Law Office, P.C., West Des Moines, for appellant.

          Thomas J. Miller, Attorney General, and Louis S. Sloven, Assistant Attorney General, for appellee.

          Considered by Potterfield, P.J., and Doyle and Tabor, JJ.

          TABOR, Judge.

         After a high-speed chase through Des Moines, William Taylor ran his sports utility vehicle (SUV) head-on into a squad car driven by a peace officer. A jury convicted Taylor of assault on a peace officer with a dangerous weapon and eluding. He appeals those convictions, contending (1) the State failed to offer sufficient proof of his assaultive intent and (2) his trial counsel was ineffective for not impeaching four peace officer-witnesses with their prior testimony. Because the State presented substantial evidence from which the jurors could infer Taylor's specific intent to cause pain or injury to the officer or to place the officer in fear of immediate physical contact, which would have been painful, injurious, insulting, or offensive, we affirm the assault verdict. On the impeachment issue, the district court denied Taylor's request for a new trial on this allegation of ineffective assistance of counsel. We reach the same result on appeal. Finally, we find no ground for reversal in Taylor's pro se supplemental brief. Accordingly, we affirm his convictions.

         I. Facts and Prior Proceedings

         On patrol in the early morning hours of June 13, 2015, Des Moines police noticed a Mercury Mountaineer SUV being driven without proper license plates. When the officers signaled the driver to stop, he instead accelerated-reaching speeds of 80 miles per hour on Interstate 235 and 60 miles per hour in residential neighborhoods. About four miles into the pursuit, the driver-later identified as Taylor-drove onto his own yard and was surrounded by three squad cars. Three separate dash cameras recorded the incident. The videos show Taylor making a U-turn on the grass, and then revving his engine, before ramming headlong into a squad car driven by Officer Trevor Spear.

         The officers seized Taylor, who told them he was running because he had a warrant out for his arrest. The State charged Taylor with assault on a peace officer with a dangerous weapon, in violation of Iowa Code section 708.3A(2) (2015), as an habitual offender, under section 902.8 and 902.9, and eluding, in violation of section 321.279(2). A jury convicted Taylor on both offenses, and he stipulated to his prior felony convictions. The district court sentenced Taylor to a total of fifteen years in prison with a mandatory minimum term of three years. Taylor now appeals.

         II. Scope and Standards of Review

         We review Taylor's challenge to the sufficiency of the evidence for the correction of legal error. See State v. Reed, 875 N.W.2d 693, 704 (Iowa 2016). If the jury's verdict is supported by substantial evidence, we uphold it. See State v. Rohm, 609 N.W.2d 504, 509 (Iowa 2000). "Substantial" describes evidence from which a reasonable fact finder could determine a defendant's guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. Id. We review the facts in the light most favorable to the verdict and consider not only evidence bolstering the verdict, "but all reasonable inferences which could be derived from the evidence." See id.

         We review Taylor's claim of ineffective assistance of counsel de novo because it is grounded in the Sixth Amendment. See State v. Thorndike, 860 N.W.2d 316, 319 (Iowa 2015). Taylor bears the burden to show a breach of duty by trial counsel and resulting prejudice. See Strickland v. Washington, 466 U.S. 668, 687 (1984). Failure to prove either prong is fatal to Taylor's claim. See State v. Shanahan, 712 N.W.2d 121, 142 (Iowa 2006).

         III. ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.